On to the Bay . . . Well, not So Fast!

Hudson bay--damage
SUPPLIED A motorcyclist and adventure seeker from Colorado, rode a dirt bike along the bay line from Thompson to Churchill. Reached on Tuesday near Split Lake on the return trip to Thompson, Green said that when he began his expedition, he was already aware that rail service has been suspended because of flood damage. So, as he made his way up the line, he took photos. The photographs he produced – time stamped on June 14 and obtained by the Free Press – reveal a situation much different than the one described by Omnitrax.

Canada’s Prairie farmers can be excused if they’re shedding a few tears. The railway link across  northern Manitoba, one of Canada’s Western provinces, to the tiny port of Churchill (pop. 900) on Hudson Bay has been sliced and diced by recent floods. The damage reportedly is so extensive that the operator, Omnitrax Canada, says the line may be out of service for months.

The outage is particular poignant for the farmers. Not only did they agitate for years for the line to be built, but they saw it as a way of freeing themselves from the high cost of shipping their grain to the Lake Superior port of Thunder Bay, Ont., Canada’s main outlet for Prairie wheat. And even though the line to Churchill has never lived up to its promise, it was, for Western Canadians, still their very own line.

But Omitrax may be exaggerating the seriousness of the washouts. A Winnipeg Free Press story on June 20 (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/photos-from-the-ground-tell-different-story-about-hudson-bay-railway-conditions-429783063.htmlsuggests that because flood waters have receded, getting the line back on track may take less time than the company originally said it would.

Not only does Omitrax want to unload the line, but it has been trying to do so for more than a year to a consortium of First Nations.

“A deal in principle has been reached,” the Free Press reports.  “But the First Nations have stated publicly they need support from the federal and provincial governments to complete the purchase.”

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Forging Links Across Continents

When it comes to throwing down railway tracks, China is nothing if not ambitious. Hardly a day goes by when it doesn’t announce the construction of yet another  line into the fastness of the Middle Kingdom, or the opening of yet another route for high-speed passenger trains.

But it’s in forging rail links to the rest of Asia and Europe where China is most ambitious. The country has already dispatched freight trains to Spain. And it would seem to like nothing more than to punch a standard-gauge line through Central Asia to Turkey.

China is also keen to link up with its neighbors — no mean feat, given their different gauges, as well as their lack of rail infrastructure itself.

Indeed, the break of gauge is particularly troublesome, as the map below shows. Yet, one shouldn’t rule out the possibility that a  country as big and powerful as China won’t step in and convert neighboring railway systems to standard gauge.

trans-asian railway system