Nimbies Unite!

Folks in Pickering, Ont., one of Toronto’s rapidly growing bedroom suburbs, don’t want an airport in their backyard.

Pickering airportc

They successfully blocked a bid to build one way back in the 1970s. And they continue to oppose the construction of one now.

But Roger Anderson begs to differ. He’s the chairman of the regional municipality of Durham, the supra-political body that includes Pickering and its neighbors. And he thinks the best thing the region can do to ignite its economy is to build an airport.

 

Indeed, should the Canadian government go ahead and do so, he believes, businesses would cluster themselves around the airport left, right and centre.

Whatever happens, one thing is certain:  those residents who oppose the construction of an airport will be certain to make their voices heard!

 

 

 

 

 

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Don’t Hail a Taxi. Build a Better Taxiway!

New York’s JFK Airport is in line to get better taxiways. A good thing too. Two separate incidents there in mid-August saw planes clip each other’s wings while on the taxiways. Fortunately, no one was injured. But America’s National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.

JFK is a victim of its original template, which was laid down in the 1950s and ’60s. That layout encircles terminals with two tightly spaced taxiways. Their proximity sometimes makes it hard for planes to enter and exit departure gates.

Indeed, the cheek-by-jowl set-up can put moving planes closer together than at other airports, says a report from Bloomberg News. (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-17/delta-jets-hit-two-planes-truck-over-24-hours-at-new-york-s-jfk).

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Taxiways and landing strips at New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport

Thanks to a US$10-billion upgrade, JFK is getting interconnected terminals,  centralized parking lots, more flights, new lanes (in both directions) on the Van Wyck Expressway, and state-of-the-art security that includes facial recognition technology.

 

 

Little Israel, big Accomplishment

Name a top-rated airport in the world and Singapore’s Changi comes to mind. Or
Dubai Intl. in Dubai. Or Schipol in Amsterdam. But Ben-Gurion in Israel?

After all, Changi has consistently garnered top billing in Travel + Leisure’s annual ranking, Dubai is relatively spanking new and Schipol has long been a top hub in Europe.

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Passenger lounge at Israel’s Ben-Gurion Airport

Yet, Ben-Gurion, hardly the dominant airport in its neighborhood, managed to elbow out both Schipol and Dubai to take third spot in Travel + Leisure’s list for 2017.  In fact, with a score of 79.40, Ben-Gurion came in less than one point below Tokyo’s Haneda Airport.

And although Travel + Leisure doesn’t give reasons for its rankings, one reason for its choice of Ben-Gurion may be that airport’s much-vaunted level of security.  Unlike Istanbul or Brussels, Ben-Gurion hasn’t witnessed a terrorist attack in decades.

Regardless, Ben-Gurion’s high score is certainly something that both the airport and Israel can take pride in.

Pearson is Pointing Itself in the Right Direction

Many airports worldwide already tie in air travel with rail, bus and subway transportation. Just think of Heathrow in London or Hong Kong International. Even Israel’s Ben-Gurion Airport, a piker among the world’s heavyweights, is directly connected to that country’s railway network.

But Toronto’s Pearson International lacks this setup. True, it does boast a rapid transit link to Toronto’s busy Union Station. But it still lacks direct connections to Via Rail, Canada’s nationwide passenger service, or to GO Transit, the commuter network that serves Toronto and its sprawling bedroom communities. Pearson also lacks any direct connection with Toronto’s subway lines.

But all this may be about to change. The airport now says it wants to morph into a mega-transportation hub with direct links to GO Transit and to the Toronto Transit Commission. The hub would also provide a berth for bus service for the City of Mississauga, the rapidly expanding city on Toronto’s western flank.

Moreover, to pay for the new hub, Pearson would allow private investors to take ownership stakes in the airport.

And although the proposed hub is just that, a proposal, it could send Pearson’s passenger numbers soaring — no small consideration, given that the airport, which in 2016 handled 40 million travelers, is Canada’s busiest.

Proposed transportation hub at Toronto’s Pearson Intl. Airport

transport hub

A Migdal (tower) to Kvell (boast) About

Israel recently opened a super-duper control tower at Ben-Gurion Airport, the country’s principal gateway. And the new tower is apparently something to behold.

Approximately 110 meters high with 18 floors, the tower was built so that its windows are entirely free of pillars that might obstruct the view of air traffic controllers.

Continue reading “A Migdal (tower) to Kvell (boast) About”