When shortlines fail

At least one railway, Canadian National, makes much of its short line connections, terming them partners, as well as extensions to its far-flung network.

And by selling its unprofitable tracks to short line operators over the past few years, CN has undoubtedly emerged leaner, meaner and stronger.

But sometimes these unprofitable lines seem to fare worse under new ownership than they might have if they’d remained in the CN stable.

Consider the Cape Breton and Central Nova Scotia Railway, which took over CN’s line between Truro and Sydney, N.S. in 1993. At last report, the CBNS was trying to unload its right of way from Sydney to Port Hawkesbury on the Strait of Canso. The section reportedly needs a lot of work to bring it up to par. And the rest of the line, if this photo is any indication, may need upgrading too.

cape breton railway

Worn out rail on CBNS line near New Glasgow, N.S.

Then, there’s the Huron Central Railway, a 280-kilometre stretch between Sudbury and Sault Ste Marie, Ont., which was formerly operated by Canadian Pacific.

Although a vital transportation link for several industries in the area, the line is likely to be shut down by the end of 2018 unless the Ontario government coughs up some money

But the short line that’s likely in the worst state is the Hudson Bay Railway, which runs from The Pas in northern Manitoba several hundred kilometres to the port of Churchill, Man. on Hudson Bay.

Because of flooding in the spring of 2017, that portion of the railway between Amery, Man. and Churchill has been shut down, cutting the latter’s only ground link to the outside world. And although it appeared as if another company was recently ready to step in and buy the HBR, that plan has now fallen through.

 

Advertisements

It isn’t Art

Hideous. Embarrassing. An eyesore.

Graffiti on railway freight cars may be many things, but art isn’t one of them.  Just ask the railways.  Not only does graffiti often cover up identification numbers and other important information, but it reportedly costs at least  US$1,000 just to paint over each side of the lower half of a freight car. In addition, the daubs and pop-art lettering do little to enhance corporate image.

Freight_Whole_Car_Piece

But there’s another problem that troubles freight haulers and that’s the danger in which graffiti “artists” could find themselves.  Although box cars and other rolling stock may be standing still when the painters attack, a string of cars can start moving at any time, thereby endangering life and limb.

To date, though, the railways haven’t come up with any method of easily stripping off the graffiti. Or, if they have, they obviously haven’t been using it, as can be seen when any freight train in North America rumbles by.

 

 

 

African Union on the Right Track

If there’s one thing Africa badly needs, it’s a continent-wide railway network. Africa is no nearer one than it was back in the late 19th Century when Cecil Rhodes first broached the idea of a Cape-to-Cairo railway.

Indeed, Africa lags far behind both North America and Europe, which have long since enjoyed continent-wide connectivity. Indeed, Canada and the U.S. sewed up an integrated network more than 100 years ago.

But Africa may have taken steps, albeit small ones, to piece together a more unified railway system. Abou-Zeid Amani, the African Union’s commissioner for infrastructure and energy,  recently said that railway connectivity is one of the union’s flagship projects.

True, that project might seem over-ambitious, given its call for high-speed railways linking  all of Africa’s capitals and big cities.  But putting railway connectivity on the AU’s to-do list is still a big step forward.

africarail