Let’s Believe it When we See it!

High-speed passenger rail is taking the world by storm. Not only does it already exist in Europe, but it’s been munching up the miles in China, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan.

So, it’s no surprise that Ontario, Canada’s wealthiest and most populous province, is now trying to get on board. True,  Ontario’s proposal to lay down a line between Toronto and Windsor, four hours to the southwest, would cost billions. And the province doesn’t have that kind of money.

But Ontario is shelling out C$15 million to study the feasibility of such a service. And, well, ya gotta start some place, right?

The route the province is considering would snake through Ontario’s industrial heartland, tying together such cities as Guelph and Kitchener-Waterloo, the centre of the province’s high-tech industry. The route would also link London, a centre for education and medical research, and Chatham.

HSR NETWORK

More important, the route would make Toronto’s rapidly growing bedroom suburbs that much more attractive to immigrants and young couples who can no longer afford to buy a home in the city’s overheated housing market.

Then, too, if Ontario can pull high-speed rail out of a hat, it will have done what no government in Canada has managed to do. Although high-speed passenger service has long been touted for the Quebec City-Windsor corridor, it has yet to leave the station.

In the late 1960s, Canadian National Railways introduced the turbo, a high-speed passenger service between Montreal and Toronto. But, plagued with mechanical

lorne perry turbo

All aboard?

 

 

Hamilton is really getting on the GO

Mention Hamilton. Ont. and you think of  lunch buckets, bare knuckles and blue plate grub. That’s because the city of 520,000, roughly 60 kilometres west of Toronto, was for decades the centre of steelmaking in Canada.

But today, Hamilton increasingly stands to become a bedroom suburb of Toronto, thanks to more frequent train service.

With the widening of a bridge over the Desjardins canal just outside Hamilton’s downtown (see below), GO Transit,  Ontario’s commuter rail system, will soon provide the city with more frequent service.

And with home prices in Toronto continuing to skyrocket, good transit links will make Hamilton much more attractive to families who can no longer afford to live in Toronto.

But Hamilton isn’t the only locale that will benefit from the bridge widening. Ontario’s Niagara Region, which fans out from the city around the western end of Lake Ontario, will also be a beneficiary.

Indeed, GO eventually hopes to extend  its service to both St. Catharines and Niagara Falls. And when it does, both cities, now medium size, should also burgeon as bedroom suburbs.

Maybe, just maybe. . .

Not only is Eilat Israel’s southernmost city, it’s also Israel’s southernmost port. But it’s never been connected to the country’s railway network, despite Israel’s many pledges over the years to do just that. In fact, Eilat still sits roughly 200 km. south of the end of track, which is near the desert city of Dimona.

But Eilat may soon find itself joined by rail to the rest of Israel. China is mulling over the construction of a high-speed railway link between Eilat and the Israeli port of Ashdod south of Tel Aviv. Indeed, trains on the 350-km line would zip along at 250-300 km an hour. The line, which would also handle freight trains, would be built in large part to steal business away from the Suez Canal.

 

But the project won’t be without its challenges. Not only would the line require 63 bridges and five tunnels, but construction, now pegged at roughly US$6.5 billion, could end up double that amount, says Dr. Mordechai Chaziza, a senior lecturer at Israel’s Ashkelon Academic College, who specializes in  Chinese foreign and strategic relations.

Still, the project does fire the imagination, if only because of its promise of  finally linking Eilat to the rest of the country by means of steel wheels running on steel rails.

 

 

 

Africa needs the economic blast that only railways can provide

Railways have historically been generators of economic growth, connecting new markets to existing ones, finding buyers in the interior for manufacturers on the coast. North America, for example, would never have become the economic powerhouse it became at the turn of the last century, had railways not laid down a dense web of lines. Indeed, by 1900, the rails blanketed the continent., their uniform gauge making possible the quick transfer of freight from Canada to the U.S. and vice versa.

But Africa is missing out on the economic blast that only railways can provide. More than 100 years after Cecil Rhodes dreamed of a Cape-to-Cairo line, the continent seems no closer than it was then to realizing Rhodes`dream.

And although dozens of rail lines run from various points on the coast to various parts of the interior, these tracks don`t even begin to suggest the likelihood of a continent-wide railway network — a network that will be difficult to build, given the different gauges that are now being used.